26th 9:14 pm

Don’t buy tires before you read this…

Ever wondered what do the numbers like P185/60HR14 on your car tires mean? If you are not sure, you are not alone. In a recent survey 78% of people did not know what their tire spec number meant. A whopping 93% did not know the disadvantages of Performance All Season Tires over regular All Season Tires. So here is a comprehensive guide on how to select the perfect tires for your auto.

Tire Selection Guide: What Everybody Ought to Know About

Let’s start with the Tire number system. A typical tire number looks like: P185/60HR14. Here is how to decode it.

Tire Size Calculator

  1. The first spot represents the type of vehicle. P for passenger cars and LT for light trucks and SUV’s
  2. The second spot number(185 in this example) is the tire cross-section width in millimeters
  3. The third spot (60 in this example) is the aspect ratio: The tire sidewall height to the cross-section width. For a smoother ride, choose this number to be bigger. A smaller number here gives a crisper handling.
  4. The fourth spot is the max speed rating
    • H = 130 miles per hour
    • Q = 99 miles per hour
    • S = 112 miles per hour
    • T = 118 miles per hour
    • v = 149 miles per hour
    • Z = 150 miles per hour
  5. R in the fifth spot means that it’s a radial-ply tire. Other choices here are D (diagonal) or B (belted bias). If this spot has no letter at all, it means that it is a radial-ply tire.
  6. And the final number is the diameter of the tire hole in inches. A point to note that this is NOT the outer diameter. So if you were looking for a rim/wheel to fit on a 14″ tire, you would pick the rim/wheel to be 14″ as well.
  7. Sometimes, there is an additional number at the end. (E.g. P185/60HR14 89). This last number represents a load index. The bigger this number, the more the load the tire can safely carry. When replacing your tire, make sure that the new tire has at least the same load index as what you had before.

PS: Some tire company use a slightly different format: Instead of P185/60HR14 89, they write P185/60R14 89H.

So there you have it… Now you can buy tires like a pro! In the next blog, I will describe various type of tires, and explain advantages and disadvantages for each so that you can pick the perfect tires to fit your needs.

posted in All Season tires, All Terrain Tires, ATV Tires, Car Tires, Discount Tires, Motorcycle Tires, Mud Tires, SUV Tires, Tractor tires, Trailer tires, Truck Tires, Winter/Snow Tires | Comments Off

25th 5:15 pm

The ONLY Tire Selection Guide You Need

In Part 1 of this series, I explained tire size decoding. In this blog, I will explain the different types of tires and their pros and cons.

Tires are categorized by many different methods:

  1. By Performance
    1. All Season tires
    2. Performance All Season tires
    3. Ultra High Performance All Season tires
  2. By the Type of Vehicle they will be used on
    1. Passenger Tires
    2. Light Truck/SUV tires
  3. Special Usage Category
    1. Snow/Winter tires
    2. Off-road tires (aka All Terrain tires or Mud tires)

Tire catogorgy by Performance

  • All Season tires (aka All Weather tires)
    • Best For:
      • Most passenger vehicles (Most nnew vehicles are sold with all weather tires)
      • Year around good performance in all kinds of weather
      • Lowest tread wear
      • Decent traction
      • Most comfortable ride
      • Most economical (Prices
    • But …
      • No high controlled-handing for extremely wet or snowy roads
      • If you live in regions with very wet or snowy conditions, consider other tires
    • Cost
      • Typically between $30 to $90 per wheel
    • Available for
      • Tire size 13, 14 and 15 inches
      • For Passanger and light truck/SUV vehicles
  • Performance All-Season Tires
    • Best for
      • Better handling for wet and snowy surfaces
      • Lose some ride comfort to get better traction
    • But …
      • Since softer material is used to get better traction, tread wear is higher
      • Somewhat less comfortable ride
    • Cost
      • $50 to $140 per wheel
    • Available for
      • Tire size 15, 16 and 17 inches
      • For Passanger and light truck/SUV vehicles
  • Ultra High Performance All Season tires
    • Best for
      • Sports car and other high performance vehicles
      • Greatest control and handling, best cornering
      • Increased speed rating
      • Summer conditions
    • But …
      • They have the quickest tread wear
      • Not designed to be used in very wet and snowy conditions
        People typically switch to all season or winter tires during winter months
    • Cost
      • $80 to $180
      • If your wheel rims are small, you may have extra cost of replacing them as well
    • Available for
      • Tire sizes 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20 inches
      • For Passanger and light truck/SUV vehicles

Tire Category by the Type of Vehicle they will be used on

  • Passenger Tires
    • Designed to be used with cars, minivans and other passenger vehicles
    • Designed for ride comfort, low noise, low trade-wear
    • For driving in paved surfaces on highways and cities
  • Light Truck/SUV tires
    • Designed to be used with SUV’s, pick up trucks and off-road vehicles
    • Designed for heavier load capacity
    • Can withstand more demanding environmental conditions
    • A must if your vehicle is used for towing or hauling

Tire Special Usage Category

  • Snow/Winter tires
    • Designed for maximum braking performance and traction on ice, snow and wet roads
    • Made with special material that can keep it pliable even in extreme cold temperatures
    • In many states you do not need tire chains if you have snow tires on your vehicle
  • Off-road tires (aka All Terrain tires or Mud Tires)
    • Designed for use on roads, dirt, gravel, grass, mud, rough terrain
    • Big, wide treads to ensure the tire does not get stuck in mud
    • Typically come in bigger sizes to give higher clearance for your vehicle
    • Sturdy construction to reduce flat tires or structural damage

There you have it! Now you can but tires online or offline like an expert.

posted in All Season tires, All Terrain Tires, ATV Tires, Car Tires, Discount Tires, Motorcycle Tires, Mud Tires, SUV Tires, Tractor tires, Trailer tires, Truck Tires, Winter/Snow Tires | 0 Comments

10th 11:54 pm

How to buy tires online and save money

If you are like me, buying tires online won’t come across as the first option. In the past, I would just go to a local Big O Tires, Sears or Walmart auto center to choose from what they had in stock. This changed a couple of years back when I ordered my tires online for the first time for my SUV. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in All Season tires, All Terrain Tires, ATV Tires, Car Tires, Discount Tires, Motorcycle Tires, Mud Tires, SUV Tires, Tractor tires, Trailer tires, Truck Tires, Winter/Snow Tires | 0 Comments